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Anwar Mammoth
Anwar Mammoth

A Guide to The True Believer Eric Hoffer Epub 22: What is the Book About and Why Should You Read It?



The True Believer Eric Hoffer Epub 22: A Classic Book on Mass Movements and Fanaticism




In today's world, we witness the rise and fall of various mass movements that attract millions of followers and shape the course of history. From religious cults to political parties, from social revolutions to nationalist movements, mass movements have a powerful influence on human affairs. But what makes people join and follow these movements? What drives them to sacrifice their individuality and freedom for a collective cause? And what are the effects of these movements on society and civilization?




The True Believer Eric Hoffer Epub 22



These are some of the questions that Eric Hoffer explores in his classic book The True Believer, first published in 1951. Hoffer was a self-taught philosopher and social thinker who worked as a longshoreman in San Francisco. He wrote the book after witnessing the rise of fascism and communism in Europe and Asia, as well as the emergence of various religious sects in America. He wanted to understand the psychology and sociology of mass movements, and how they can be both beneficial and destructive for humanity.


In this article, we will summarize the main ideas and arguments of The True Believer, as well as its relevance and implications for today's world. We will also answer some frequently asked questions about the book at the end.


The Author: Who was Eric Hoffer and what inspired him to write the book?




Eric Hoffer was born in 1902 in New York City to German immigrants. He had a difficult childhood, as he lost his sight at age seven due to an accident, and his mother died soon after. He regained his vision at age fifteen, but his father died shortly after that. He then left home and became a migrant worker, traveling across America and working various jobs. He also developed a passion for reading and learning, especially philosophy, history, and psychology.


In 1941, he settled in San Francisco and became a longshoreman, a worker who loads and unloads ships. He continued to read voraciously in his spare time, often borrowing books from public libraries. He also started to write essays on various topics, such as religion, politics, art, culture, etc. He published his first book, The True Believer, in 1951, when he was 49 years old. The book was an instant success, and earned him recognition and praise from critics and readers alike. He went on to write several more books, such as The Ordeal of Change, The Passionate State of Mind, and The Temper of Our Time. He died in 1983 at age 80.


Hoffer was inspired to write The True Believer by his observations of the rise of totalitarian regimes and fanatical movements in the 20th century. He saw how millions of people were willing to follow charismatic leaders and adopt radical ideologies, often at the cost of their own lives and liberties. He wanted to understand the nature and dynamics of mass movements, and how they can appeal to different types of people and situations. He also wanted to offer some insights and suggestions on how to deal with the challenges and dangers posed by mass movements.


The Main Ideas: What are the key concepts and arguments of the book?




The True Believer is divided into four parts, each consisting of several short chapters. The book is not a systematic or academic treatise, but rather a collection of aphorisms, anecdotes, examples, and quotations that illustrate Hoffer's ideas and arguments. The book is also not limited to any specific historical or geographical context, but rather applies to mass movements in general, regardless of their time, place, or content.


The main ideas and arguments of the book can be summarized as follows:


The Nature of Mass Movements: How do mass movements arise and what do they offer to their followers?




Hoffer defines a mass movement as "a type of social movement that attracts large numbers of people who are dissatisfied with their current conditions and who believe that a radical change is necessary for their salvation". He argues that mass movements are not driven by rational or realistic goals, but rather by vague and utopian visions that promise a glorious future for their followers. Mass movements are also not concerned with the welfare or happiness of their followers, but rather with their loyalty and devotion to the cause.


Hoffer identifies three main factors that contribute to the rise of mass movements: discontent, hope, and faith. He argues that mass movements appeal to people who are unhappy with their lives, who feel frustrated, bored, alienated, or oppressed by their circumstances. Mass movements offer them hope for a better future, a sense of purpose and direction, and a way to escape from their personal problems. Mass movements also require faith from their followers, a blind belief in the validity and superiority of their doctrine, and a willingness to obey and sacrifice for their leader.


The Types of Mass Movements: What are the differences and similarities between religious, nationalist, and social movements?




Hoffer distinguishes between three main types of mass movements: religious, nationalist, and social. He argues that each type has its own characteristics, motives, methods, and outcomes. However, he also points out that there are many similarities and overlaps between them, as they all share the same basic nature and dynamics.


Religious movements are based on faith in a supernatural power or being that can provide salvation and guidance to their followers. They often involve a conversion experience, a radical change in one's beliefs and values. They also tend to be intolerant of other religions or worldviews, as they claim to have the exclusive truth and authority. Religious movements can be either reformist or revolutionary, depending on whether they seek to change or overthrow the existing order.


Nationalist movements are based on loyalty to a nation or a group that shares a common identity, culture, history, or destiny. They often involve a sense of pride, patriotism, or superiority over other nations or groups. They also tend to be hostile to foreigners or enemies who threaten or oppress their nation or group. Nationalist movements can be either defensive or offensive, depending on whether they seek to protect or expand their territory or influence.


Social movements are based on solidarity with a class or a category of people who share a common interest, problem, or grievance. They often involve a sense of injustice, oppression, or exploitation by another class or category of people. They also tend to be revolutionary or radical in their aims and methods, as they seek to overthrow or transform the existing social order. Social movements can be either progressive or reactionary, depending on whether they seek to advance or restore a certain state of affairs.


The Stages of Mass Movements: How do mass movements evolve and change over time?




The Leaders of Mass Movements: What are the characteristics and roles of the leaders who shape and direct mass movements?




Hoffer argues that mass movements need leaders who can inspire and mobilize their followers, who can articulate and embody their vision and doctrine, and who can organize and manage their activities and resources. He identifies three main types of leaders that mass movements have: men of words, fanatics, and practical men.


Men of words are the intellectuals, writers, speakers, or prophets who create and spread the ideas and ideals of the mass movement. They often criticize and challenge the existing order, and appeal to the discontented and dissatisfied masses. They also provide a sense of identity and direction to the movement, and a justification for its actions. However, men of words are usually not good at leading or governing the movement, as they tend to be impractical, idealistic, or detached from reality.


Fanatics are the zealots, activists, or martyrs who embody and enforce the ideas and ideals of the mass movement. They often act as the agents and instruments of the movement, and demonstrate their loyalty and devotion to the cause. They also provide a sense of passion and urgency to the movement, and a motivation for its followers. However, fanatics are usually not good at creating or sustaining the movement, as they tend to be intolerant, violent, or self-destructive.


Practical men are the organizers, managers, or rulers who consolidate and control the ideas and ideals of the mass movement. They often act as the leaders and administrators of the movement, and establish its structure and policies. They also provide a sense of order and stability to the movement, and a solution for its problems. However, practical men are usually not good at initiating or innovating the movement, as they tend to be pragmatic, conservative, or opportunistic.


The Followers of Mass Movements: What are the psychological and social factors that make people join and stay in mass movements?




Hoffer argues that mass movements attract people who have a low sense of self-worth, who feel insignificant, powerless, or unfulfilled in their lives. He calls them "the frustrated", as they are unable to realize their potential or achieve their goals in their current situation. He also argues that mass movements appeal to people who have a high need for change, who are bored, restless, or dissatisfied with their routine or status quo. He calls them "the bored", as they are eager for excitement or adventure in their lives.


Hoffer suggests that mass movements offer four main benefits to their followers: identification, substitution, unification, and renunciation. He explains that mass movements allow their followers to:



  • Identify with a larger and more important group or cause than themselves, which gives them a sense of belonging and significance.



  • Substitute their personal problems or responsibilities with a collective mission or duty, which gives them a sense of purpose and direction.



  • Unify with other like-minded people who share their beliefs and values, which gives them a sense of solidarity and support.



  • Renounce their individuality or freedom for a higher authority or principle, which gives them a sense of sacrifice and devotion.



rituals, symbols, etc. These techniques are designed to influence and manipulate the followers' emotions, thoughts, and behaviors, and to create a sense of unity and conformity among them.


The Implications: What are the consequences and challenges of mass movements for individuals and society?




Hoffer argues that mass movements have both positive and negative effects on individuals and society. He acknowledges that mass movements can provide some benefits, such as:



  • They can inspire and motivate people to pursue noble and worthy goals, such as freedom, justice, or peace.



  • They can foster creativity and innovation, as they challenge the existing norms and paradigms, and introduce new ideas and perspectives.



  • They can enhance social cohesion and cooperation, as they bring people together for a common cause, and create a sense of community and solidarity.



However, he also warns that mass movements can pose some dangers, such as:



  • They can lead to violence and destruction, as they often resort to force and aggression to achieve their ends, and disregard the rights and interests of others.



  • They can stifle diversity and individuality, as they impose a uniform and rigid doctrine on their followers, and suppress any dissent or deviation.



  • They can undermine reason and morality, as they appeal to irrational and fanatical passions, and justify any means for their ends.



Hoffer suggests that individuals and society need to be aware and vigilant of the potential benefits and dangers of mass movements. He also offers some advice and recommendations on how to cope with and respond to mass movements. Some of his advice are:



  • Individuals should cultivate a healthy sense of self-worth and self-reliance, and avoid becoming too dependent or dissatisfied with their lives.



  • Individuals should seek a balance between change and stability, and avoid becoming too bored or restless with their situation.



  • Individuals should exercise critical thinking and independent judgment, and avoid blindly following or opposing any movement or leader.



  • Society should promote education and culture, and encourage people to develop their talents and interests.



  • Society should foster tolerance and dialogue, and respect the diversity and rights of different groups and individuals.



  • Society should support democracy and humanism, and protect the values and principles of freedom, justice, and peace.



The Conclusion: What are the main takeaways and lessons from the book?




and dynamics of mass movements, and how they appeal to and affect different types of people and situations. It also examines the implications and challenges of mass movements for individuals and society, and how to cope with and respond to them. The book is relevant and applicable to any mass movement, regardless of its time, place, or content.


The main takeaways and lessons from the book are:



  • Mass movements are driven by discontent, hope, and faith, and offer their followers a sense of identity, purpose, unity, and sacrifice.



  • Mass movements can be religious, nationalist, or social in nature, and have different characteristics, motives, methods, and outcomes.



  • Mass movements go through four stages: inception, rise, culmination, and decline, and face different challenges and opportunities in each stage.



  • Mass movements need leaders who can inspire, mobilize, organize, and control their followers. These leaders can be men of words, fanatics, or practical men.



  • Mass movements attract followers who have a low sense of self-worth and a high need for change. These followers benefit from identification, substitution, unification, and renunciation.



  • Mass movements have both positive and negative effects on individuals and society. They can inspire creativity and cooperation, or lead to violence and intolerance.



  • Individuals and society need to be aware and vigilant of the potential benefits and dangers of mass movements. They also need to cultivate a healthy sense of self-worth, self-reliance, balance, critical thinking, education, culture, tolerance, dialogue, democracy, and humanism.



FAQs: What are some common questions and answers about the book?




Here are some common questions and answers about the book:



  • Q: When was the book written and published?



  • A: The book was written in 1951 and published in the same year.



  • Q: Who is the target audience of the book?



  • A: The book is intended for anyone who is interested in understanding the psychology and sociology of mass movements.



  • Q: What is the main message or thesis of the book?



and that they have both positive and negative effects on individuals and society.


  • Q: What are some examples of mass movements that the book refers to or analyzes?



  • A: Some examples of mass movements that the book refers to or analyzes are: Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, nationalism, fascism, communism, socialism, democracy, feminism, environmentalism, etc.



  • Q: What are some criticisms or limitations of the book?



  • A: Some criticisms or limitations of the book are: it is too general and abstract, it lacks empirical evidence and data, it ignores the diversity and complexity of mass movements, it oversimplifies the causes and effects of mass movements, it is biased or outdated in some aspects, etc.



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